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Jun 16

Dear Mr. Moneybags Jr., here is the summary for the sequel to The Hound of the Baskervilles, please make this happen.

Stapleton is back, and this time, he’s out for revenge. After foiling Stapleton’s plot of deception upon the Baskerville home, and presumed dead, Stapleton seemingly returns from the grave and plants a bomb in Holmes’s office while Holmes and Watson are out. The explosion knocks Watson into a comma, a forces Holmes into a deadly game of cat and mouse. While Holmes struggles with his failure to protect Watson, he is forced to save Sir Hugo Baskerville, Dr. James Mortimer, Miss Beryl Stapleton, John and Eliza Barrymore form devious death traps throughout London and trying to find clues to Stapleton’s hideout. Is Stapleton really back, or the plot of an even deadlier villain?

Starring Robert Downy Jr. as Sherlock Holmes, Henry Cavil as Watson,Benedict Cumberbatch as Stapleton, Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Laura Lyons, John Goodman as Dr. Mortimer, and Anne Hathaway as Miss Beryl Stapleton, The City of the Baskervilles will excite and amuse while making you question your morals and drive you to better yourself. From director George Lucas and Steven Spielberg comes the new summer block buster: The City of the Baskervilles. 

Jun 16

Motivation

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My main motivation for reading The Hound of the Baskervilles besides it being a necessary assignment, is reading the work of an acclaimed author. Not many authors are knighted, so to read the work of one such acclaimed author feels gratifying. The monumental impact of Sherlock Holmes is worth reading, and filling in the gaps of my literary experience is the main motivation. I want to be able to read all of the classics that have truly made an impact. To that end, I consider myself a completist of sorts: I need to read all of the instrumental works of literature.

My only demotivation has been the chaos that has erupted. I am moving into a new house, and because of the requirements needed to move, I have found some difficulty in finding the time to read. I have already read most of the works for other classes (this is my second to last read) so I suppose that I have more time than I let myself believe, but my obsessive compulsive nature forces me to work as hard as possible and as quickly as possible in some mistaken fear that I won’t have enough time to do what must be done. But because nothing uneventful has happened yet, there is nothing that can stop me.

Jun 16

First Impressions

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Upon first reading The Hound of the Baskervilles, I was doubtful of its ability to capture reader’s attention like it did back when it was first published. The passage of time and changing of literary styles would create a barrier to which readers could not effectively enjoy the material. But while that may be the case for many, I found myself enjoying the book’s depiction of Sherlock Holmes by  building on the basic “master detective” that we all know and adding a sense intelligence and humanistic qualities that many forget in today’s portrayal of the detective. The writing style didn’t seem too different from other literary styles other than one aspect worth mention: localization.

Of the other works I have read so far, The Hound of the Baskervilles has been the most successful at creating a believable world. By actually using the time-specific language spoken in the day such as “a farrier,” and being unafraid to use advanced vocabulary including “dolichocephalic,” this helps to more accurately create the world of Holmes and giving us a picture of 1889 London by showing the reader how the people of London actually spoke and acted through specific vocabulary, making these characters (both the main characters and side characters) relevancy in the specific time of London. Also, other works by different authors that came before that are alluded to help to set the time frame including an allusion to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream when Watson is giving a report to Holmes: “And yet the course of true love does not run quite as smoothly.” Creating a sense of time is very enjoyable.

Other works haven’t been able to as effectively create a time and region for their stories and instead go for general details so more imagination is required. For that I must state how much I have actually enjoyed The Hound of the Baskervilles much to my surprise. Sir Author Conan Doyle gives us the details, we the reader just paint the picture.